Winfield Scott's Coat Buttons
Winfield Scott's Coat Buttons.png

Origin

Winfield Scott

Type

Coat Buttons (5 in total)

Effects

Has the power to slowly squeeze the life out of wearer, crushing and killing them. Known to age it's victim(s) to the point of advanced old age.

Downsides

Effects

Activation

Wearing

Collected by

Aaron Anderson

Section

Sun Tzu-28D

Aisle

28D-02D

Shelf

786089-98708-786658

Date of Collection

June 15th, 1934

[Source]


Origin[edit | edit source]

Winfield Scott (June 13, 1786 – May 29, 1866) was a United States Army general, and unsuccessful presidential candidate of the Whig Party in 1852.

Known as "Old Fuss and Feathers" and the "Grand Old Man of the Army," he served on active duty as a general longer than any other man in American history, and many historians rate him the best American commander of his time. Over the course of his 53-year career, he commanded forces in the War of 1812, the Black Hawk War, the Mexican-American War, the Second Seminole War, and, briefly, the American Civil War, conceiving the Union strategy known as the Anaconda Plan that would be used to defeat the Confederacy. During the civil war he drew up a plan to defeat the Confederacy by blockading Southern ports and sending an army down the Mississippi Valley. Scott's scheme was derided as the "Anaconda Plan", intended to crush the Confederacy slowly; eventually the actual Union victory followed its broad outlines. This is where some of the effects come from, when his plan was set aside and never used, but became imbued into his coat buttons.

Effects[edit | edit source]

When a victim (or victims) wears any piece of clothing that have the button attached to it, they experience a sudden force slowly crushing them. Once the button kills the victim it cancels all effects and lays in a dormant state. The coat buttons also age the victim as they are crushed.

Autopsy reports will show that the victim dies from crushed bones, tissue and old age.

Collection[edit | edit source]

One of the buttons was collected by Aaron Anderson on June 15th, 1934. Four of the coat buttons are still out in the world.

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