Richard the Lion-Herted's Armor
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Origin

Richard I of England

Type

12th Century Battle Armor

Effects

Fills wearer with chivalric bravery and desire to defeat foes.

Downsides

N/A

Activation

Wearing

Collected by

Warehouses 8, 10, 12 and 13

Section

Artie's Office

Aisle

Podium 1

Date of Collection

1283, 1602, 1673, 1888 and 1942

[Source]


Origin[edit | edit source]

Richard Ist of England, often recognized with his famous epithet, Richard the Lion-Hearted, was the King of England who started the third Holy Crusade. He was known to lead his men into battle and offered no quarter to his foes. His bravery in battle is what gave him his nickname, and he was respected greatly by his men.

The various pieces of his battle armor have bounced around the globe and have affected many people during their travels. Notable people affected by this collection of artifacts include Enzo of Sardinia, Stephen F. Brown and Jack Churchill.

A suit of armor was situated by the door to the Umbilicus in several episodes and was blown to pieces in "The New Guy". Despite being identified as Richard's in the novel "A Touch of Fever", this is not the case. The armor is not of the correct time period to have belonged to Richard, and is in fact Sir William de Beaumont's.

Effects[edit | edit source]

This set of armor contains six pieces. The helm, coif, chainmail, surcoat and two leather gauntlets. Of these, the coif was recovered in 1283 from Enzo of Sardinia's tomb, a gauntlet in 1602 following the Battle of Kinsale, the helmet in 1673 from the aftermath of the Battle of Khotyn, chainmail from Stephen F. Brown's family belongings in 1888 and the surcoat from Jack Churchill in 1942, during WWII. One gauntlet remains missing, and it is possible that boots, a shield and a sword are a part of the set.

When worn, the affected becomes filled with a chivalric bravery, encouraging them to fight with honor and dignity. Enemies are offered little quarter. The affected also becomes fond of hand-to-hand weaponry and will tend to favour bows over firearms. The sense of bravery often leads to reckless behavior, particularly in combat, though luck seems to alter slightly to keep the affected alive.

The artifacts have a bleeding effect of sorts, the more they are worn, the longer the effects linger after use.

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