Peter III of Russia's Toy Soldiers
PeterIII.jpg

Origin

Peter III of Russia

Type

Tin Toy Soldiers

Effects

Swarming Irritant

Downsides

Mental Taxation

Activation

Touch

Collected by

Warehouse 11

Section

Constatine-77GH

Aisle

154288-8060

Shelf

209859-7337-696

Date of Collection

July 16, 1762

[Source]


Origin[edit | edit source]

Peter III was emperor of Russia for six months in 1762. He was viewed as ineffective and disliked as a leader his failed attempt invading Denmark and alliances with Prussia and Great Britain. He also pushed liberal reform policies, such as removal of the secret police, political power for serfs and reorganization of the economic and nobility systems. He was deposed and possibly assassinated on orders of his wife, his successor Catherine the Great.

Peter repeatedly played with these toy soldiers and mistresses instead of tending to his wife. On time, a rat happened to appear on his mock battlefield. Peter decided to capture the rat and hang it for trespassing.

Effects[edit | edit source]

Imbued with Peter III's delusional dedication to playtime, these toy soldiers will animate when touched, and will constantly annoy the closest creature they can find. Powered by the intellect of the person who activated them, the strain of keeping them active will drain the user’s intellect to that of an uneducated child, who has not been taught to control their impulses. This will, in turn, make the soldiers unstable and act erratically.

Interestingly, the soldiers seem to take not so kindly to rodents.

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