Osborne Reynolds' Attire
Attire.jpg

Origin

Osborne Reynolds

Type

Robed suit

Effects

Slows down objects when in physical contact.

Downsides

None identified

Activation

Physical contact

Collected by

Wilesjeffrey2152

Section

Homobonus-MT8

Aisle

131-20

Shelf

2027-902-5805

Date of Collection

7/3/13

[Source]


Origin[edit | edit source]

Osborne Reynolds FRS (23 August 1842 – 21 February 1912) was a prominent Anglo-Irish innovator in the understanding of fluid dynamics. Separately, his studies of heat transfer between solids and fluids brought improvements in boiler and condenser design.

Fluid Mechanics[edit | edit source]

Reynolds most famously studied the conditions in which the flow of fluid in pipes transitioned from laminar flow to turbulent flow. From these experiments came the dimensionless Reynolds number for dynamic similarity — the ratio of inertial forces to viscous forces. Reynolds also proposed what is now known as Reynolds-averaging of turbulent flows, where quantities such as velocity are expressed as the sum of mean and fluctuating components. Such averaging allows for 'bulk' description of turbulent flow, for example using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations.

His publications in fluid dynamics began in the early 1870s. His final theoretical model published in the mid-1890s is still the standard mathematical framework used today. Examples of titles from his more groundbreaking reports:

Improvements in Apparatus for Obtaining Motive Power from Fluids and also for Raising or Forcing Fluids. (1875)
An experimental investigation of the circumstances which determine whether the motion of water in parallel channels shall be direct or sinuous and of the law of resistance in parallel channels. (1883)
On the dynamical theory of incompressible viscous fluids and the determination of the criterion. (1895)

Reynolds' contributions to fluid mechanics were not lost on ship designers ("naval architects"). The ability to make a small scale model of a ship, and extract useful predictive data with respect to a full size ship, depends directly on the experimentalist applying Reynolds' turbulence principles to friction drag computations, along with a proper application of William Froude's theories of gravity wave energy and propagation. Reynolds himself had a number of papers concerning ship design published in Transactions of the Institution of Naval Architects.

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