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Natalie Nickerson's "Jap Skull" aka "Tojo"
JapSkullsGirl

Origin

May 22, 1944 Life Magazine Picture of the Week

Type

Skull

Effects

Makes user want to kill and take trophies from his/her victims

Downsides

Effects

Activation

Reading the inscription on the skull

Collected by

Artie Nielson

Section

Wrath-61446

Aisle

122-6002

Shelf

11054-85525-156

Date of Collection

September 30th, 1988

[Source]


OriginEdit

During World War II, some American soldiers took part in the awful practice of mutilating the remains of fallen Japanese soldiers. The fact that this was done only to Japanese soldiers, not to German ones, highlights the hypocritical racism of the American war effort. One such incident that gained national attention was the case of Natalie Nickerson. Her boyfriend went off to war and promised her a "Jap" skull. He sent one back inscribed with the names of himself and some of his friends, as well as the message "This is a good Jap – a dead one picked up on the New Guinea beach." Ms. Nickerson named it "Tojo" after the Japanese prime minister, Hideki Tojo. A picture was taken and made the picture of the week for Life Magazine. The picture was met with outrage and disgust by the American public at the barbaric practice.

UsageEdit

Reading the inscription on the skull activates the effects. The user feels compelled to kill and take trophies from his/her victims. These trophies may come in the form of possessions or body parts such as teeth, hair, limbs, etc.

This artifact may be neutralized the usual way, but another method was discovered. When the user is spoken to in Japanese, he/she will snap out of it without the need for neutralizer.

CollectionEdit

Artie collected the real one from the Japanese Museum in Pearl Harbor where it was on display briefly. As a precaution against accidental activation, the skull is kept inside a sound-proof box.

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