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Martin Waldseemüller’s Construction Gores
Construction gores

Origin

Martin Waldseemüller

Type

Map Segments

Effects

Reorganizes components for more equal spacing

Downsides

Summons large volumes of water

Activation

Intentionally adjusting the pieces

Collected by

Warehouse 10

Section

Colombus-1492PK

Aisle

Ptolemy-628F

Shelf

744085-2916-408

Date of Collection

April 9, 1708

[Source]


OriginEdit

Martin Waldseemüller was a German cartographer noted for being one of the first mapmakers to name the newly discovered western lands “America”, in honor of explorer Amerigo Vespucci. Printed in 1507, the Universalis Cosmographia shows America as two separate landmasses connected by a thin strip of land. Using accounts from contemporary explorers, he added in the new discoveries into one of Ptolemy’s atlases, considered to accurately represent the Old World. Accounting for already known locations such as Malacca in the East Indies, Waldseemüller understood that these new lands had to be separate from Eurasia. The only sensible assumptions he could make were the continents were spread further apart than before, and another ocean separated the Americas and known world.

A singular print has survived, which is now on permanent display in the Library of Congress. However, Waldseemüller also created globe gores, flat segments that could be glued together to form a physical globe by aligning the curves.

EffectsEdit

Moving the pieces around will cause the enclosing space to reorganize itself. Any unbolted object or workstation well be moved around into an optimal pattern, allowing ample space for large, fragile or hazardous elements. It also slowly conjures water wherever the user goes, growing in intensity with time until the whole ground is swamped.

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