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Marie Guichon's Red Hood
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"Hey there Little Red Riding Hood.
You sure are looking good.
You're everything that a big bad wolf could want."

Origin

Marie Guichon/Charles Perrault

Type

Red Hooded Cape

Effects

Grants everlasting youth while worn, and allows the wearer to take on a monsterous wolf-like form.

Downsides

Causes a dependency on the artifact, with the belief that they cannot live without it once it has been worn.

Activation

Wearing

Collected by

Warehouse 10

Section

Formerly Grimm Sector

Date of Collection

17th Century

[Source]


OriginsEdit

Sewn by her grandmother, this hooded cloak was owned and worn by Marie Guichon, a young woman who would later marry the noted fairy-tale writer Charles Perrault who based the character of Little Red Riding Hood on her. But her relationship with Perrault was manipulative and abusive and, after he stole her hood one day to coerce her to obey him, she decided to escape. In 1678, she faked her death, stealing back her hood in the process and fled to India aboard a trading vessel. It is believed that the hood became an artifact at this time, born from her defiance and desire to escape a doomed life of misery.

In India, she discovered the new power of the hood and used it sparingly, though to great effect. There she amassed a small fortune through trading and other illicit means before attracting the attention of Warehouse 10. They managed to take the hood from her, starting a fued between her and the Warehouse that came to fruition some three-hundred years later. It was recorded in the Warehouse database as 'Charles Perrault's Cloak' for centuries until these events

EffectsEdit

The wearer of the hood is granted instant youth and vitality, allowing for an incredibly long lifespan. This effect continues after the cloak is removed, though the aging process is slowed considerably. The wearer can also metamorphose into a wolf-like form, larger and more intelligent than any known breed. However based on recorded use, the hood may infect the wearer with a constant desire to own the hood, and removing it from them can lead to obsessive, though rational and well thought out, behaviour. This downside is only assumed, however, as only one person has ever been recorded to use the hood and it did possess significant sentimental value to them at the time.

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