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Love-In-Idleness
Viola-tricolor

Origin

'A Midsummer Night's Dream'

Type

Flower

Effects

Causes the person to fall in love with the first person he or she sees

Downsides

None

Activation

Applying the juice of the flower to a persons eye.

Collected by

Warehouse 13

Section

Antheia-7066G

Aisle

283955-1725

Shelf

76321-87931-231

Date of Collection

24.03.2014

[Source]


"That very time I say (but thou couldst not)
Flying between the cold Moon and the earth,
Cupid all arm’d; a certain aim he took
At a fair Vestall, throned by the West,
And loos’d his love-shaft smartly from his bow,
As it should pierce a hundred thousand hearts,
But I might see young Cupids fiery shaft
Quencht in the chaste beams of the watry Moon;
And the imperial Votresse passed on,
In maiden meditation, fancy free.
Yet markt I where the bolt of Cupid fell.
It fell upon a little western flower;
Before, milk-white: now purple with loves wound,
And maidens call it, Love in idleness.
Fetch me that flower; the herb I shew’d thee once,
The juice of it, on sleeping eye-lids laid,
Will make or man or woman madly dote
upon the next live creature that it sees.
Fetch me this herb, and be thou here again,
Ere the Leviathan can swim a league."-A Midsummer Night's Dream (Act 1, Scene 2)


OriginEdit

Love-In-Idleness is another name for the Viola Tricolor, a wild pansy. In the play, the flower stated above came to existence when Cupid missed and hit a flower instead. This flower is a plot device in Shakespeare's Comedy 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' in which Puck, a fairy, accidentaly uses the flower on the wrong person. This caused massive confusion but in the end, the flower is used again to restore order.

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