FANDOM


John A. Roebling's Steel Cable
John A. Roebling's Steel Cable

Origin

John A. Roebling

Type

Steel Cable

Effects

Constructs suspension bridges over impasses

Downsides

Sections dissipate when not in heavy use

Activation

Throwing over an obstacle

Collected by

Warehouse 13

Section

Imhotep-218G

Aisle

900784-6082

Shelf

763410-8768-812

Date of Collection

April 3, 1995

[Source]


OriginEdit

John A. Roebling was a civil engineer who specialized in constructing wire suspension bridges. The United States at the time required better ways of transporting finished goods and produce between the eastern cities and western farms. Roebling’s bridges, including the Brooklyn Bridge, helped move people and goods across the country instead of by canal and railway.

EffectsEdit

When thrown over a large, impassible obstruction (crevasse, body of water, blockade, minefield, etc.), the cable will create a suspension bridge from its own fibers. The cable will hover in the air and then rapidly rotate until the metal starts to grow lengthwise. It will then split into several directions, with new pieces added everywhere. Vertical cables to hold tension will sprout from the top, while the sides will replicate to form a dense, knotted weave for the bridge’s base. Each bridge will only be attached to the endpoints the user decides, while the rest of the body will be suspended above the ground, floating.

The bridge can grow for great distances, although unused portions quickly dissipate when no large loads are present. Standard width appears to be equivalent to one highway lane, but the track can grow to accommodate wider vehicles.

Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.