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Jean Paul-Satre’s Paper Cutter
Paper cutter

Origin

Jean Paul-Satre

Type

Paper Cutter

Effects

Dissociates people from their values

Downsides

Gradually erodes self-awareness until consciousness ceases

Activation

Usage

Collected by

Warehouse 13

Section

Socrates-953A

Aisle

750882-6406

Shelf

190935-4918-492

Date of Collection

November 1, 1949

[Source]


OriginEdit

Jean Paul-Satre is regarded as one of the most prominent existentialist philosophers ever. His personal mantra to life was there was no pre-determined purpose for life. Unlike a paper cutter, which could be assumed to possess some function and therefore creator, the same logic could not be applied to humans. By those lines, human nature had no clear source of inspiration and our behaviors are fully our own, not the results of some higher order. Another of his beliefs was that there existed two separate versions of consciousness with different levels of awareness.

Satre also believed individuality was a hallmark of consciousness, of realizing one’s own being. He flaunted this idea by constantly taking the limelight to argue against oppression across the world. Calling out communism for badly applying Marxist principles and colonialism for treating others inhumanely, Satre rejected all prizes awarded to him – including the Nobel Prize.

EffectsEdit

Induces an inquisitive mindset that makes the user question the validity of certain assumptions set by society. Is freedom truly better, does the present actually exist, are we just actually constructs of what we think we are?

Besides humoring many, it also causes the user to separate from their normal psychological demeanor, leaving them devoid of consistent morals. While active, the user will slowly lose sense of self until they are ultimately unable to recognize their own existence. The mind ceases displaying any sign of consciousness, and the affected just becomes a husk.

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