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Harry Harlow’s Monkey Models
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Origin

Harry Harlow

Type

Wooden Models

Effects

Causes parental attachment to selected subject

Downsides

Affected will feel unappreciated, abandoned and depressed

Activation

Seeing a person’s identifying image alongside the model

Collected by

Warehouse 13

Section

Psyche-764

Aisle

576940-6264

Shelf

478959-7329-465

Date of Collection

May 12, 1994

[Source]


OriginEdit

Harry Harlow was known for testing how maternal separation and isolation from others affected social and cognitive development. His experiments would consist of depriving baby rhesus monkeys with their mothers and substituting them with wood, cloth and wire replicas. Each would quickly imprint upon their false mother; tests showed they would always head towards the cloth-covered models, even when the wire ones had milk. Harlow understood that the infants required more than sustenance from their mothers, such as nursing from comfort contact and a sanctuary to run to when frightened.

He next subjected infant macaques to partial and total isolation by placing them in cages and other apparatus away from all contact. Monkeys separated for even short periods would have difficulty interacting, although ones isolated for six or more months would have an easier time rebounding with therapy compared to their counterparts. Harlow was widely denounced afterwards for his unethical treatment of animals and has remained controversial to this day.

EffectsEdit

The user will imprint upon the model like a newborn searching for its parents. Presenting a photographic reference or vocal sample will make the subject revere that person instead.

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