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George Harrison's Copy of "He's So Fine"
George Harrison's Copy of He's So Fine

Origin

George Harrison

Type

Record

Effects

Listening to the record allows the listener to create perfect replicas of anything

Downsides

Listening for too long implants a subconscious desire to plagiarize things

Activation

Listening

Collected by

Warehouse 13 Agent

Section

Euterpe-583L

Aisle

6212-4302

Shelf

7011-3904-7115

Date of Collection

1975

[Source]

Origin

George Harrison was a musician best known as the lead guitarist and a vocalist for The Beatles. He also had a thriving solo career, and perhaps his most famous hit was "My Sweet Lord". However, not long after release, Harrison was hit with a copyright lawsuit, as "My Sweet Lord" music was almost identical to "He's So Fine", a 1962 song performed by The Chiffons. It was ruled that "My Sweet Lord" was pretty much the same song as "He's So Fine", although George Harrison had only copied it subconsciously. This copy of the song is what Harrison listened to as he wrote "My Sweet Lord".

EffectsEdit

Listening to the song will allow the listener to create perfect replicas of anything that they have a basic knowledge of. For example, they cannot create a complex car engine that they have never seen before. This artifact was utilised in the replication of the Honjo Masamune katana and Billy Joel's Piano, both very difficult to replicate. However, listening to the music for too long implants a subconscious desire in the mind to plagiarise things, which is almost impossible to remove.

CollectionEdit

In 1975, reports came in off a man in Covent Garden, London selling antique clocks at relatively cheap prices. He also always had the same clocks on sale at all times, even when one was sold. After agents questioned the man at his Covent Garden market stall, where he claimed to just be a very avid collector, they searched his house. In there, they found boxes and boxes of clock parts, paint, and other tools, where they worked out he was simply creating perfect replicas of clocks he owned and kept. In the middle of the mess, they found the record, which was obviously out of place and neutralised. The man was still obsessed with replicating his clocks, although they never were as good as before.

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