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Galla Placidia’s Gold Glass Medallion
Turin portrait

Origin

Aelia Galla Placidia

Type

Gold Glass Artwork

Effects

Acts as a predictive emotional indicator

Downsides

Family alienation

Activation

Wearing

Collected by

Warehouse 4

Section

Ovoid Quarantine

Date of Collection

446 AD

[Source]


OriginEdit

Galla Placidia was daughter of emperor Theodosius I and always involved in Roman politics. She was briefly married to Constantius III and even earlier, Visigoth king Ataulf. Constantius died from illness, while Ataulf was assassinated in a revenge plot.

Her brother Honorius roped her into resolving a papal conflict between two different claimants, Eulalius and Boniface I. Her letters reaching out to African and Gaulish bishops swayed the vote in Boniface’s favor. At this point, empress and twice widow Placidia trekked through several power grabs and acted as Regent for Valentinian III. Her son. Until he became independent and decided he could handle his rivals alone. A pity – his sister Justa Grata Honoria asked Attila the Hun to help break her marriage. He assumed they wanted to have nuptials together, and the misunderstanding ended with complete wrath brought across the Roman countryside.

EffectsEdit

The face embedded in the glass will morph to resemble the user. It will appropriately react to surprises like the wielder, showing anger or happiness at the right moments. Basically an ancient mood ring. Except every face made occurs several days before the actual event that causes it. Seeing what will likely happen may make the experience feel more intense – or cause frustration for the same reason.

Causes misfortune to befell family members. When affected, the face will briefly switch to show them in anguish. Many wearers reported feeling a disconnect to their family even when their support may be greatly needed.

TriviaEdit

  • A near duplicate, possibly commissioned by the royal family, is seen today in the Turin Museum of Ancient Art. Agents determined it was not an artifact during a sweep of the museum for disturbances in 2004.
  • Was used from the 1870s to 1960s to help detect when general artifact disturbances were going to occur in the Warehouse. Phased out with the creation of the Salinger Inventory Scanner.
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