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Emergency Broadcast System False Alarm of 1971
Emergency card plaque

Origin

US Emergency Broadcast System

Type

Radio Signal

Effects

Broadcasts a false emergency message

Downsides

Induces extreme panic

Activation

Entering administrator access

Collected by

Warehouse 13

Section

Aether-729W

Aisle

648035-7044

Shelf

318724-3481-242

Date of Collection

January 24, 2018

[Source]


OriginEdit

Acting as the main American emergency alert system from 1963 to 1997, the blare annoyed millions for decades. All messages, from local to presidential breakthroughs, were broadcasted to participating stations only. During a slight kerfuffle in February 1971, an employee played an authentic warning signal instead of the weekly test tape, which informed all stations to air the alert.

Forty minutes and six attempts were needed to deactivate the alarm. More disconcerting was not the operators bungled protocol, but the alarm never reached broadcasters. The majority either ignored the alert or were unprepared to handle the message, forcing major reforms in operating procedure.

EffectsEdit

Elusive in nature, its latent signal hides dispersed across communication devices. When prompted by an override password from any connected security or alert system, it displays an emergency message across all networked devices. The alert is always tailored to a local issue that threatens the neighboring infrastructure.

CollectionEdit

It was recently captured after some technological trapping - not before unleashing chaos across Hawaii. The approach of a North Korean ballistic missile in January 2018 was thankfully a false alarm.

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