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Edward Covey's Flogging Whip
Edward Covey's Flogging Whip

Origin

Edward Covey

Type

Flogging Whip

Effects

Whip inflects damage only to the user.

Downsides

Damage inflected doubles when used on another person.

Activation

Whipping

Collected by

Harold A. Whither

Section

Vlad-768R

Aisle

654747-76543

Shelf

3230928-349284-498234

Date of Collection

July 3rd, 1889

[Source]


OriginEdit

Edward Covey (December 2, 1805 - May 2, 1875), a farmer of Talbot County, Maryland was an early 19th-century American slaveholder. He is described by Frederick Douglass in My Bondage and My Freedom (published in 1855) as a "first rate hand at breaking young negroes".

In 1833, Douglass was rented to Covey for a year so that Covey would break the teenage slave's spirit. One day, after numerous vicious beatings at Covey's hands, Douglass fought back. He fought off Covey's cousin and his fight with Covey himself, which lasted nearly two hours long, ended with Douglass' victory.

Douglass later wrote that "It is, perhaps, not altogether creditable to my natural temper, that, after this conflict with Mr. Covey, I did, at times, purposely aim to provoke him to an attack, by refusing to keep with the other hands in the field, but I could never bully him to another battle."

EffectsEdit

Imbued with Douglass' defying nature, the whip has the power to turn on it's owner.

When used against a person, the whip will only strike the user of flogging whip, giving them twice damage they would inflect on the target person.

CollectionEdit

Known as one of the "Civil War" artifacts, it had been on Warehouse 12's Most Wanted List for years before it was collected on July 3rd, 1889 by agent Harold A. Whither.

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