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Douglas Smith's Apple II Plus
Douglas Smith's Apple II Plus

Origin

Douglas Smith

Type

Computer

Effects

Allows the user to reshape the land around them when programming in 6502 Assembly Language

Downsides

Reshaping the land can allow for some incredibly dangerous alterations

Activation

Using/Programming

Collected by

Warehouse 13 Agent

Section

Babbage-1822

Aisle

16977-422

Shelf

1202-1983-788

Date of Collection

2011

[Source]

Origin

Douglas Smith was a video game designer who was most famous for being the developer of the original Lode Runner. Lode Runner was released in 1983 for the Apple II computer, and was notable for being one of the first video games to feature a level editor, which allowed players to create their own complete levels that play identically to the developer built levels. It was programmed in 6502 Assembly Language on this very Apple II Plus computer.

EffectsEdit

Writing and executing code written in 6502 Assembly Language using the computer allows the user to shape the land around them. The area the user is able to affect is approximately a circle with a diameter of 20 miles. Competitively simple functions include creating hills and craters. However, the computer can also be used to affect that land in incredibly dangerous ways, such as creating huge ravines that split apart the earth. The computer is always activate and exclusively displays a programming interface, even when it is not receiving power.

CollectionEdit

Warehouse agents were alerted to the artifact's presence when a ravine suddenly split the city of Aberdeen, Washington in half. The mission was frantic with constant setbacks, due to the programmer using the computer constantly messing with the land around the agents. Eventually, the computer was tracked down to the basement of the programmer's house and neutralised. This caused the land around the town to return to how it was before.

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