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Douglas Adams' Copy of "Hitch-hiker's Guide to Europe"
Hitchiker's Guide to Europe

Origin

Douglas Adams

Type

Guide Book

Effects

Using the copy allows its owner to retain a exceedingly large amount of knowledge into their brains

Downsides

Delusion of ultimate knowledge, eventual insanity

Activation

Reading

Collected by

Nick Renson

Section

Clio-362A

Aisle

9309-889898

Shelf

390489-83948230-982

Date of Collection

May 25th, 2012

[Source]


OriginEdit

Douglas Noel Adams was an English writer, humorist, dramatist and a satirist. He is best known as the author of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, which originated in 1978 as a BBC radio comedy before developing into a "trilogy" of five books. According to Adams, the idea for the title occurred to him while he lay drunk in a field in Innsbruck, Austria, gazing at the stars. He was carrying a copy of The Hitchhiker's Guide to Europe, and it occurred to him that "somebody ought to write a Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy". He later said that the constant repetition of this anecdote had obliterated his memory of the actual event.

This copy was imbued with Douglas' ideas for this "Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" he had in mind.

EffectsEdit

Using the copy allows its owner to retain a exceedingly amount of knowledge into their brains, but the artifact gives the delusion of ultimate knowledge, often leading to insanity from not knowing the ultimate answer. When faced with this problem, the agents found out that the artifact could be neutralized by saying "42" to the victim which cancels all activity and severs the connection from the artifact and the victim.

The only residual effects seem to be a unknown fascination with towels.

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