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Dorothy Day’s Chalkware
Mary chalk
“The greatest challenge of the day is: how to bring about a revolution of the heart, a revolution which has to start with each one of us?”
Loaves and Fishes

Origin

Dorothy Day

Type

Chalkware Figurine

Effects

Body swapping

Downsides

Degradation of personal morals

Activation

Placing inside a dwelling

Collected by

Warehouse 13

Section

Gandhi-503JH

Aisle

984006-8092

Shelf

190876-3286-451

Date of Collection

July 28, 1992

[Source]


OriginEdit

Ever the activist, Dorothy Day seemed to be a card-carrying member of every leftist organization in the early 1900s. Socialism, the Wobblies and anarchic writings all enthralled her to act. She picketed alongside Alice Paul for women’s suffrage on the and Cesar Chavez for worker’s rights. Under the tutelage of Peter Maupin, the Catholic Worker Movement was born to its most steadfast leader.

Compassion was the driving force behind her actions. In every column written she advocated rights for the working class, minorities and children, even when in direct conflict with Church doctrine or government policy. She loathed hippies’ ignorant attitude towards hardships and objected war recruitments on principle alone. Even though Day disagreed with her liberal colleagues, she respected all regardless of the -ism they subscribed to. All people, no matter their past deeds, were all equal because they each shared a tiny amount of humanity within.

EffectsEdit

Makes user switch lives with a random person they don’t personally know and struggle through their hardships as an equal. The people swapped are usually ones who would have little respect for each other upon meeting, such as a longtime logger and idealistic environmentalist. Duration and discomfort ramp up the more each person sticks to their stick-in-the-mud beliefs. Only after appreciating another’s differences will the figure deactivate.

Attempts to remain faithful to long held notions backfire. Disagreements with a friend over small minutiae grow until uncertainty engulfs the argument. Users will reject large portions of their defining code until they have no personal rules to abide by. Just a big ugly mess of random philosophy quotes, cheap gimmicks and self-doubt.

Served as a stepping point for the Twilight Zone episode "To See the Invisible Man".

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