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Dionysius Exiguus’ Easter Table
Easter calendar

Origin

Dionysius Exiguus

Type

Calendar

Effects

Sutures together multiple timelines

Downsides

Temporal disorientation

Activation

Usage within religious ceremony

Collected by

Warehouse 8

Section

Chronos-29BTTF

Aisle

739055-1934

Shelf

642813-7648-842

Date of Collection

1283

[Source]


OriginEdit

Scythian monk Dionysius Exiguus was tasked with the momentous challenge of resetting the Roman calendar to accommodate the birth and death of Jesus Christ. Using his repository of religious and mathematical studies, Dionysius worked on deciding an official date to place Easter, an issue which had split the church in two. He chose the eastern Alexandrine format as a basis while extending the dates another 95 years per request of Pope John I. Apparently, the dates would then correspond with the Second Coming of Christ according to Biblical calculations, so the calendar system began on the year 532.

The new naming system of Anno Domini (A.D.) began, replacing calendars based upon the foundation of Rome or rule of Diocletian, a Christian persecutive emperor. Although imperfect in consistently placing holidays and leap years, the dates were refined into the modern Gregorian and Julian calendars now commonly used today.

EffectsEdit

Including within a religious ceremony, especially a Christian one, will cause the calendar to vibrate and release harmonious notes. It allows different temporal anomalies to coexist together seamlessly, preventing paradoxes and alternate histories from overriding another. Different versions of time will be somewhat insulated from each other’s native elements, preventing irreversible changes. Seeing peoples and landscapes from different time periods alongside one another is not unusual, even if those events never occurred in the main continuity.

However, the user loses all sense of their relation to time. They will be unable to process seconds accurately, lose all measurement of the passage of time and even experience different age-related symptoms at once.

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