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Chōchin-obake

Origin

Unknown

Type

Japanese paper lantern

Effects

Startling

Downsides

Effects

Activation

Proximity

Collected by

Warehouse 12

Section

TBA

Aisle

TBA

Shelf

TBA

Date of Collection

TBA

[Source]


OriginEdit

The Chōchin-obake is a yōkai from Japanese folklore. It was described by Toriyama Sekien as a chōchin (bamboo-paper lantern) with a human face and long tongue. Chōchin-obake appears in many different accounts from the Edo period under various names such as Bura-bura, Oiwa-san and Oiwa no Bōkon. Due to the slightly different descriptions given in each, it is theorized to be a common form of artifact in Japan, possibly due to the prevalence of Kabuki theater depicting them.

EffectsEdit

Though the large suspected number of specimens may have varying effects, the two procured by Warehouse 12 are largely the same. Both, when approached by a human while in an inactive, will illuminate and split open, revealing a small fire burning within. It seems to enjoy the moment of shock expressed by the victim and may use a piece of its material as a tongue to waggle at them. The lanterns will self-repair after a while and rarely "prank" the same person twice in a row.

One lantern, collected from a prominent Kabuki theater, has the image of a male Japanese man's face visible on the paper when it illuminates. This face is slightly animate as the eyes can blink and may follow a person. The origin of this artifact is suspected to be the play "Tōkaidō Yotsuya Kaidan" in which the spirit of a man named Oiwa inhabits a chōchin.

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