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Bill Hicks’ Contact Lens
Contact lens

Origin

Bill Hicks

Type

Contact Lens

Effects

Causes affected to become entranced in dreamlike realities

Downsides

User’s anger and disgust will become twisted into injuries

Activation

Asking for help searching for it

Collected by

Warehouse 13

Section

Thalia-171J

Aisle

403584-4672

Shelf

962549-6692-635

Date of Collection

March 1, 2000

[Source]


OriginEdit

Bill Hicks was a stand up comedian and satirist whose material encompassed dark comedy involving religion, politics, consumerism and drug use. Hicks maintained an on-again off-again relationship with drug use, incorporating his chain-smoking into later acts. He presented his skits in an angered and uncaring way, while maintaining a casual rapport with the audience, acting like a conversing friend. Many of his jokes were jabs at the fallacies of society and reveled in counterculture. Hicks often discussed conspiracy theories in his acts, and would sometimes end acts with a mock assassination, gunshot bang included.

Several times, his segments have been heavily edited or removed from programming due to censorship, specifically on David Letterman shows. He was also friends with longtime comedian Denis Leary until they had a falling out, where Hicks accused Leary of stealing his work and delivery style and publishing it in a book. In some of his earlier performances, he opened concerts for the rock band Tool. One time he asked thousands of audience members to help him search for his dropped contact lens, which they did.

EffectsEdit

The lens causes the victims to experience the thralls of a disjointed, psychedelic existential wonderland. Activates by asking others to help look for the lens. After they wander for a few minutes, they will be subjected to strange and surreal visions that they can barely comprehend but are pleased by. A good shake or bump is all it takes to bring them out, although returning is just as easy. The activator will have any of their pent up anger, disbelief and scorn manifest into physical injuries, such as those associated with long-healed gunshot wounds.

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