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Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Fairy Notebook
162827-004-76836220

Origin

Arthur Conan Doyle

Type

Notebook

Effects

Causes firm belief in spiritualism and the supernatural

Downsides

Affected individuals will violently defend their new beliefs

Activation

Reading

Collected by

M.C.Escher

Section

Unspecific

Aisle

--

Shelf

--

Date of Collection

1.18.1930

[Source]


OriginEdit

Belonging to famed English author Artur Conan Doyle, this notebook documents his theories and beliefs of the (now proven fake) Cottingly Fairies and other spirits. In his later life Doyle became increasingly fascinated by the spiritual world and would fiercely defend these beliefs. In a noted incident, his then friend Harry Houdini performed some tricks for Doyle in his own home. Despite Houdini insisting that they were merely tricks and illusions, Doyle insisted that Houdini possessed some form of magic. Annoyed and frustrated, Houdini and Doyle had a falling out and did not speak further.

This artifact was one of several collected from the estate of Doyle after his death. It caused some problems with Agent Escher when it afflicted him, compounded by his already extensive knowledge of "the magic building where the fairies gather their toys". It is suspected that Doyle's exposure to several artifacts throughout his life may have bolstered his belief, thus creating both his determination to prove himself right and this artifact.

EffectsEdit

When read, the user develops a strong belief in magic, the paranormal and supernatural. This effect deepens as more of the book is read and can lead to a lifelong psychosis. Affected people will become extremely determined to prove themselves right, and become aggressive if contested. They will ignore direct proof and solid fact in favor of their delusions.

Due to the nature of Warehouse work, it is advised no-one touch this artifact, and it is stored in a glass case near Doyle's other personal effects and artifacts.

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