Warehouse 13 Artifact Database Wiki
Advertisement
Warehouse 13 Artifact Database Wiki

Spread throughout the Judaic aisles of the Origin Circle. Titles of saint will be ignored due to continual repetition.


Hand saw.jpg

Origin: Simon was one of the most obscure of the Twelve Apostles, with little recorded besides his name.

Effects: Instills respect for the owner, but cannot be used to threaten or harm another living thing.

Collection: March 19, 1904

30-pieces-of-silver.jpg

Origin: Judas Iscariot was one of the original Twelve Apostles to Jesus Christ who betrayed Jesus for thirty silver coins, resulting in Jesus’s crucifixion and Judas’ suicide. Today, the word Judas is synonymous with traitor.

Effects: The coins can be used to make a person betray someone or something that they would ordinarily be loyal to. The party betrayed could be a friend, family member, mentor, organization, company, country... anything a person feels loyalty towards. By telling someone what you would like them to do (To a Secret Service agent: "I want you to leave the President unguarded at 9:00 PM on May 20th.") and then giving them one or more of the coins, that person will be compelled to follow your wishes. After the betrayal, the person affected by the coins will feel a deep regret - the worse the betrayal, the deeper the regret. The worst cases will fall into a depression and possibly commit suicide.

There are thirty coins in all. Depending on who or what you are asking a person to betray you may need to use more than one coin. The stronger the loyalty the person has toward what you want them to betray, the more coins you will have to give them. There is almost nothing a person will not betray in exchange for all thirty pieces of silver. The coins are not technically bifurcated, each coin is an independent artifact, and so they can be neutralized separately.

Collection: June 17, 2009

Wood chippings.png

Origin: Andrew was an Apostle and the brother of Saint Peter, who was one of the disciples closer to Jesus, being present at the Last Supper.

When he was to be put to death by crucifixion, he pleaded to the Romans that they not nail him to the cross in the same way as Jesus, as he felt himself unworthy to die in the same way. The solution was to make the cross into an X shape, thus implementing the first known use of the device that would come to be known as a St. Andrew's Cross.

Effects: Forms a wooden cross barrier when held by someone in need of desperate help.

Collection: 401 AD

Roman ruler.jpg

Origin: Jude is recognized as one of the Apostles of Jesus Christ. He is sometimes debated to also have been Jesus’s brother, but is clearly a different person than Judas Iscariot.

Effects: Affects luck, allowing the holder to escape from otherwise hopeless situations. It will confuse the user's true identity to others with every use.

Collection: 1536

Origin: Matthew was one of the twelve Apostles to Jesus Christ and one of the four Evangelists according to the Bible.

Effects: Can influence the wealth of anyone specified by the user at the cost of someone else having the opposite luck.

Collection: 692

MilanCathedralBartholomew.jpg

Origin: Bartholemew was an Apostle alternatively identified as Nathanael and was one of the disciples to witness Jesus appearing on the Sea of Galilee after Resurrection. Some think he went on missionary tours into India, Armenia, Mesopotamia and Ethiopia.

Density Miracle

The people of Lipari celebrated his feast day annually, traditionally taking the solid silver and gold statue from inside the Cathedral of St. Bartholomew and carry it through the town. On one occasion, when taking the statue down the hill towards the town, it suddenly became very heavy and had to be set down. When the men carrying the statue regained their strength, they lifted it a second time. After another few seconds, it got even heavier. They set it down and attempted once more to pick it up. They managed to lift it but had to put it down one last time. Within seconds, walls further downhill collapsed. If the statue had been able to be lifted, all the townspeople would have been killed.

During World War II, the Fascist regime looked for ways to finance their activities. The order was given to take the silver statue of St Bartholomew and melt it down. The statue was weighed, and it was found to be only a few grams. It was returned to its place in the Cathedral of Lipari. In reality, the statue is made from many kilograms of silver and it is considered a miracle that it was not melted down.

Effects: When picked up, it allows the user to alter the density of their selves and nearby objects in the environment. It can cause sudden increases in the density and gravitational effects on objects, causing them to collapse under their own extreme weight.

Collection: 9/23/1948

Simon's Saw

Simon's Saw
Hand saw.jpg

Origin

Simon the Zealot

Type

Saw

Effects

Causes people to respect the owner

Downsides

Cannot be used to harm any creature

Activation

Holding

Collected by

Warehouse 12

Shelf

892436-27745-006

Date of Collection

March 19, 1904

[Source]


Origin

Simon was one of the most obscure of the Twelve Apostles, with little recorded besides his name.

Effects

Instills respect for the owner, but cannot be used to threaten or harm another living thing.




Judas Iscariot’s Thirty Silver Coins

Judas Iscariot’s Thirty Silver Coins
30-pieces-of-silver transp.png

Origin

Judas Iscariot

Type

Thirty Silver Coins

Effects

Betrayal to anyone they are loyal to

Downsides

Extreme regret, possible depression and suicide risk

Activation

Giving someone a coin(s) and giving them a request

Collected by

Warehouse 13

Shelf

88812-1268-267

Date of Collection

June 17, 2009

[Source]


Origin

Judas Iscariot was one of the original Twelve Apostles to Jesus Christ who betrayed Jesus for thirty silver coins, resulting in Jesus’s crucifixion and Judas’ suicide. Today, the word Judas is synonymous with traitor.

Effects

The coins can be used to make a person betray someone or something that they would ordinarily be loyal to. The party betrayed could be a friend, family member, mentor, organization, company, country... anything a person feels loyalty towards. By telling someone what you would like them to do (To a Secret Service agent: "I want you to leave the President unguarded at 9:00 PM on May 20th.") and then giving them one or more of the coins, that person will be compelled to follow your wishes. After the betrayal, the person affected by the coins will feel a deep regret - the worse the betrayal, the deeper the regret. The worst cases will fall into a depression and possibly commit suicide.

There are thirty coins in all. Depending on who or what you are asking a person to betray you may need to use more than one coin. The stronger the loyalty the person has toward what you want them to betray, the more coins you will have to give them. There is almost nothing a person will not betray in exchange for all thirty pieces of silver.

The coins are not technically bifurcated, each coin is an independent artifact, and so they can be neutralized separately.



Apostle Relics
Simon's Saw Shards of the Cross of AndrewJudas Iscariot’s Thirty Silver Coins Philip's Basket Statue of Bartholomew Thomas' Carpentry Square Matthew's Tax Lodger Nails from the Crucifixion of St. PeterScallop Shell of Zebedee Matthias' Axe Jude's Carpenter's Rule Jame's Fuller's Club
Advertisement