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Aphrodite's Hairbrush
AphroditeComb

Origin

Unknown, presumably Aphrodite

Type

Hairbrush

Effects

Love inducement

Downsides

Obsessive behavior

Activation

Brushing Hair

Collected by

Warehouse 3

Section

Pantheon

Aisle

Veni-69

Shelf

370815-5719-777

Date of Collection

200 AD

[Source]


OriginEdit

Aphrodite, the Greek embodiment of beauty, sex, and sexual love, Éros, is unique in the Greek pantheon, as she is both a deity to be respected as well as a sexual female, and thus had varying interpretations both in antiquity as well as the modern day.

Aphrodite appears in many stories as a capricious figure, as desirous love was often considered by the Greeks to be a form of madness only to be the work of higher powers. Some of her most famous stories include her involvement in the Judgement of Paris (which would lead to the Trojan War) and the story of Psyche (which would lead to the marriage of Psyche and Aphrodite's son, Eros). But she was also portrayed favorably, such as her involvement in the Pygmalion story, as well as caring for children of gods or the victims of gods, like Coronides and the daughters of Pandareus.

The story of Aphrodite and Adonis manages to meet somewhere in the middle. After King Theias of Smyrna forgot to make a sacrifice in her name, Aphrodite compelled his daughter Myrrha to seduce him, which resulted in her being impregnated. To save her from her father's wrath, Aphrodite transformed Myrrah into a myrrh tree, and saved and protected her unborn child, Adonis.

Adonis was so beautiful, even as a child, that he began to distract Aphrodite from her duties, and so was sent to be raised by Persephone. Both goddesses fell in love with the child, and when he grew up they fought over him. Under Zeus' word, Adonis would spend a third of the year with each and a third with whomever he chose. This was usually Aphrodite, and his time with her is often portrayed as the ideal love between two partners. Unfortunately, Adonis was killed when a wild boar attacked him, often thought to be sent by another jealous god. As Adonis laid dying, Aphrodite held him and sprinkled his blood with nectar, flowing into the nearby water that would later be named the Adonis River.

EffectsEdit

Imbued with Aphrodite's beauty and desire, when combed through the user's hair, this artifact will compel everyone around the user to fall in love with them. The attraction, however, will only grow stronger with time, and can cause obsessive and dangerous behavior in the affected.

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