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Andrew Borden's Couch
Lizzie-bordens-house-20

Origin

Andrew Borden/Borden Murders

Type

19th Century Couch

Effects

Causes slashes to appear on user's body. Slashes get 1 inch deeper per hour.

Downsides

Effects

Activation

Sleeping on the couch

Collected by

Warehouse 13 Agent

Section

Alcatraz-3563

Aisle

Victim-4151

Date of Collection

Sep.20.1945

[Source]


OriginEdit

Lizzie Andrew Borden (July 19, 1860 – June 1, 1927) was an American woman who was tried and acquitted in the 1892 axe murders of her father and stepmother in Fall River, Massachusetts. The case was a cause célèbre throughout the United States. Following her release from the prison in which she had been held during the trial, Borden chose to remain a resident of Fall River, Massachusetts, for the rest of her life, despite facing significant ostracism. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts elected to charge no one else with the murder of Andrew and Abby Borden; speculation about the crimes continues into the 21st century.

On August 4, 1892, Andrew Borden had breakfast with his wife and made his usual rounds of the bank and post office, returning home about 10:45 am. The Bordens' maid, Bridget Sullivan, testified that she was in her third-floor room, resting from cleaning windows, when just before 11:10 am she heard Lizzie call out to her from downstairs, "Maggie, come quick! Father's dead. Somebody came in and killed him." (Sullivan was sometimes called "Maggie", the name of an earlier maid.) Andrew was slumped on a couch in the downstairs sitting room, struck 10 or 11 times with a hatchet-like weapon. One of his eyeballs had been split cleanly in two, suggesting he had been asleep when attacked. Soon after, as neighbors and doctors tended Lizzie, Sullivan discovered Abby Borden in the upstairs guest bedroom, her skull crushed by 19 blows. Police found a hatchet in the basement which, though free of blood, was missing most of its handle. Lizzie was arrested on August 11; a grand jury began hearing evidence on November 7 and indicted on December 2.

CollectionEdit

Soon after the Borden Murders, the Fall River police took the couch for evidence. At one point, the police sold off the couch, not knowing its significance. A Warehouse agent purchased it, and moved it to the Crime and Punishment Vault

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