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Ambrose Bierce's Skull
AmbroseBierce

Origin

Ambrose Bierce

Type

Skull

Effects

Siphons positive emotions

Downsides

Emotional enslavement

Activation

Focusing on a person

Collected by

Warehouse 13

Section

Chthon-902P

Aisle

662797-7995

Shelf

221719-7048-120

Date of Collection

March 15, 2008

[Source]


OriginEdit

Ambrose Bierce was a journalist and short story writer famous for his short story "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" and the satirical compilation “The Devil’s Dictionary”. His vehemence as a critic, his motto "Nothing matters", and the sardonic view of human nature that informed his work, all earned him the nickname "Bitter Bierce." His style often embraces an abrupt beginning, dark imagery, vague references to time, limited descriptions, impossible events, and the theme of war.

In 1913, Bierce traveled to Mexico to gain first-hand experience of the Mexican Revolution. He was rumored to be traveling with rebel troops, but was never seen again, and his disappearance is considered one of the great mysteries of 20th century literature.

EffectsEdit

The skull, which was imbued with Bierce's apathy, will form an emotional bond with people who gaze into it's eyes, siphoning their willpower and positive emotions.

The skull is not limited to parasitic relationships, however, as extended proximity to the artifact has created slightly more symbiotic relationships, where the skull will widen the emotional bond between it and a victim in order to allow emotions it siphons to pass onto them in return for fresh people to drain, who can then be drained by the former victim themselves. These hosts become dependent on the skull in order to feel anything.

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