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Abraham Maslow's Hierarchy Chart
Maslow chart

Origin

Abraham Maslow

Type

Psychological Chart

Effects

User can achieve full potential

Downsides

May amplify negative emotions into the prime state

Activation

Reading

Collected by

Warehouse 13

Section

Psyche-764

Aisle

885177-5132

Shelf

220212-8293-292

Date of Collection

April 6, 2005

[Source]


OriginEdit

Abraham Maslow created the hierarchy of needs, which identifies the human desires needed to achieve total fulfillment in life, along with the availability and importance of each category. He placed particular importance on viewing mental health issues through a positive outlook rather than untreatable symptoms. He believed a person reached their full potential when they were “self-actualized” and truly happy with life. Recurrent traits in people that were self-actualized included honesty, spontaneity, accepting the occurrences of the world and uniqueness of their self.

In Maslow’s hierarchy, this step is the final, most difficult to attain need. When basic psychological (food, sleep) and physical levels (wellbeing of self, relatives, resources) are secure, people would move upwards along the pyramid. Meaningful relationships, confidence and mental preparedness would need to be addressed next to reach self-actualization and feel fulfilled in life. Levels below self-actualization only feel needed to survive, but not wanted to feel alive. Reaching the final step would allow for regularly ecstatic moments of love, appreciation and purpose that would otherwise not occur.

EffectsEdit

Allows a person to constantly achieve the pinnacle of their performance by granting the user increased ability or fortune in navigating the lower needs. Strong experiences of dissatisfaction, usually from traumatic moments and unwholesome desires, can cause very negative changes in mood. The user will not reach total bliss and instead fall into a state where all they can do is reflect outwards any negativity that remains.

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