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Abigail Williams' Pendent
Pendent
Hexagram Pendent

Origin

Abigail Willams

Type

Pendent

Effects

Breaking laws among your country or province is magnified and allows you to blame all of your action to one person.

Downsides

Causes a chain reaction that leads to mobs and certain death to those blamed.

Activation

Wearing and then blaming someone else

Collected by

Harrison Nelie

Section

Homobonus-MT8

Aisle

Winston-813H

Shelf

4092-3409829-8201383

Date of Collection

Feb 23, 1855

[Source]


OriginEdit

A Hexagram Pendent that was made and originally owned by one of the most major accusers of the Salem witch trials of 1692. Abigail made this Pendent after her parents were killed by Indians after a raid, she was one of the refugees that survived. Thinking that this would bring them back, a slave at the time (Tibuta) gave her a Pendent that should have conveyed the souls of the dead. This Pendent did nothing but upset her, acting crazy in hopes that this artifact would work, but it never did. Samuel Parris (The minister that took in Betty and Abigail Willams) discovered her and Betty's rantings and she started to blame other people for her "Possessions". The Pendent, while it was nothing but a mere trinket from Tibuta that did nothing, was imbued with Abigail's foolish accusations towards Sarah Good, Sarah Osbourne and Tibuta (Especially, Tibuta for giving her the fake artifact).

EffectsEdit

Breaking laws among your country or province is magnified and allows you to blame all of your actions to one person, but causes a chain reaction that leads to mobs and certain death to those blamed.

CollectionEdit

Collected by Agent H. Nelie in 1855 during the time of Warehouse 12.

Real World ConnectionsEdit

Except from Wikipedia:

Abigail and her cousin Betty Parris were the first two accusers in the Salem Witch trials of 1692. Williams was eleven years old at the time and she was living with her uncle Samuel Parris in Salem after an Indian raid resulted in the death of her parents (she was one of many Indian raid refugees in Salem). According to Rev. Deodat Lawson, an eyewitness, she and Betty began to have fits in which they ran around rooms flailing their arms, ducking under chairs and trying to climb up the chimney. It is noted that her body contorted into impossible positions.

Because of Abigail and Betty's claims to be possessed, false accusations would soon be made, resulting in 20 deaths. On February 29, 1692, three women were arrested for suspicion of witchcraft: Sarah Good, Sarah Osborne and Tituba herself. They were all found guilty, but the only one to confess was Tituba. Since the other two women did not confess, Good was hanged, and Osborne died in prison. Tituba was released out of jail a year later, when an unknown person paid her fees for release.Nonetheless, Abigail and Betty’s trend of accusing innocents rapidly spread throughout Salem and nearby villages (especially Andover), leading to the death of several innocent people Martha Corey was hanged, and her husband Giles was pressed to death for refusing to plead. John Proctor and Rebecca Nurse were also executed.

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